Under Pressure, Elizabeth Warren Discloses Her Legal Compensation – $2 Million Over 30 Years

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DES MOINES, IA - AUGUST 10: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on stage during a forum on gun safety at the Iowa Events Center on August 10, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa. Today Warren and her campaign introduced a...

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Massachusetts) has disclosed the records of her private legal practice for the past three decades. Her total compensation for three decades of private legal practice comes around to about $2 million.

This figure has been determined from the senator’s public records, personal records and other sources.

“These disclosures include all of the cases Elizabeth Warren worked on that we have been able to identify and all of the income from each case we have been able to determine from public records, Elizabeth Warren’s personal records, and other sources,” the campaign said.

There is an itemized list of legal cases dating back to the 1980s. This includes her work as a private counsel as well as those in her legal career like consulting work and mediation services.

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“If Democrats are going to defeat Donald Trump, or whoever the Republican Party might replace him with, we must nominate a candidate who can create the most robust possible contrast against Republicans on conflicts of interest and corruption issues,” Warren’s campaign spokeswoman Kristen Orthnan told The Hill in an email.

Warren has come under pressure in recent days from a fellow 2020 candidate, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D), over her compensation for her legal work. The mayor himself is facing scrutiny over his past work for consulting firm McKinsey, about which he had released few details, until last week.

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“Any candidate who refuses to provide basic details about his or her own record and refuses to allow voters or the press to understand who is buying access to their time and what they are getting in return will be seen by voters as part of the same business-as-usual politics that voters have consistently rejected,” Warren’s campaign added.

The two candidates, who have vied for top spots in early primary state polling in recent weeks, are set to meet again on stage this week at the December Democratic debate in Los Angeles.