Nation and world news briefs

©Tribune News Service

Democrat Carolyn Bourdeaux wins primary for open seat in Georgia suburbs

WASHINGTON — Public policy professor Carolyn Bourdeaux was declared the outright winner Tuesday of a crowded Democratic primary in suburban Atlanta, as absentee ballots continued to be counted a week after the chaotic June 9 elections.

Bourdeaux had 52.7% of the vote in Georgia’s 7th District in tallies posted Tuesday afternoon, when The Associated Press called the race. Candidates in Georgia primaries need to exceed 50% of the vote to win a nomination or they face a runoff with the second-place finisher. Bourdeaux was below that level last week, when the AP said she would face a runoff with Rep. Brenda Lopez Romero, who had 12.4 percent. Progressive activist Nabilah Islam was a close third in the six-candidate field, with 12.3 percent.

Bourdeaux was the 2018 Democratic nominee and unexpectedly came within 1 percentage point of beating GOP Rep. Rob Woodall. Woodall was one of the first House members to announce his retirement this cycle.

She will face GOP nominee Rich McCormick in November. McCormick won his primary with 55% of the vote. His campaign was boosted by a Trump endorsement and outside group spending after the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, when McCormick started tweeting videos bolstering Trump’s response.

—CQ-Roll Call

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Democrat Carolyn Bourdeaux wins primary for open seat in Georgia suburbs

WASHINGTON — Public policy professor Carolyn Bourdeaux was declared the outright winner Tuesday of a crowded Democratic primary in suburban Atlanta, as absentee ballots continued to be counted a week after the chaotic June 9 elections.

Bourdeaux had 52.7% of the vote in Georgia’s 7th District in tallies posted Tuesday afternoon, when The Associated Press called the race. Candidates in Georgia primaries need to exceed 50% of the vote to win a nomination or they face a runoff with the second-place finisher. Bourdeaux was below that level last week, when the AP said she would face a runoff with Rep. Brenda Lopez Romero, who had 12.4 percent. Progressive activist Nabilah Islam was a close third in the six-candidate field, with 12.3 percent.

Bourdeaux was the 2018 Democratic nominee and unexpectedly came within 1 percentage point of beating GOP Rep. Rob Woodall. Woodall was one of the first House members to announce his retirement this cycle.

She will face GOP nominee Rich McCormick in November. McCormick won his primary with 55% of the vote. His campaign was boosted by a Trump endorsement and outside group spending after the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, when McCormick started tweeting videos bolstering Trump’s response.

—CQ-Roll Call

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US-Canada border restrictions extended until July 21

DETROIT — Restrictions on border crossings to Canada will stay in place for an extra month.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced via Twitter on Tuesday that the current U.S.-Canada border measures have been extended until July 21.

The countries agreed in March to limit nonessential border crossings because of concerns with the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Those traveling for essential work have been allowed to cross, but the restrictions on other travelers were set to expire June 22.

“This is an important decision that will keep Canadians and Americans safe,” Trudeau said.

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf acknowledged in a statement that the restrictions on land ports of entry for Canada and Mexico will remain in place for the time being.

“This extension protects Americans while keeping essential trade and travel flowing as we reopen the American economy,” he said.

The announcement comes as Michigan companies return to work following the lifting of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s stay-at-home orders.

—Detroit Free Press

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Study shows nearly a quarter of adults in this Idaho county have coronavirus antibodies

BOISE, Idaho — A study has shown that roughly 23% of Blaine County’s adult population has coronavirus antibodies, according to a news release from the city of Ketchum.

Preliminary results from the antibody study — conducted by The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, and Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in New York — showed that antibodies were most prevalent in Ketchum, where roughly 35% of the city’s adults have virus antibodies, one of the highest per-capita rates of any city in the country.

More than 2,500 residents completed a survey for the study, and tests were administered to 917 of those selected.

The test results showed the large prevalence of antibodies, and the city’s news release indicated that the specificity of the test is 99.9%, meaning that only one in 1,000 could be a false positive.

Some participants noted that they did not develop antibodies even though “they live in the same household as persons with the disease and did not practice social distancing,” according to the news release.

“I am grateful to all those that signed up for this study,” said Ketchum Mayor Neil Bradshaw in the news release. “Our valley is certainly doing its part to help further the understanding of the coronavirus. There is no doubt that COVID-19 hit us hard. Our recovery is testament to the health and safe practices of our community.”

The antibody research is still being conducted, and researchers indicated that roughly 60% of a population might need immunity to reach the threshold of herd immunity.

—Idaho Statesman

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Maduro orders court takeover of opposition parties ahead of vote

CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro used the Supreme Court to take over two of the country’s most important opposition parties, laying the groundwork for congressional elections in December.

The high court suspended and replaced the boards of Democratic Action and Justice First parties in rulings Tuesday and Monday. Bernabe Gutierrez and Jose Brito, a lawmaker ensnared in a corruption scandal, were selected to head the parties.

“We have a golden opportunity to change the National Assembly,” Maduro said Tuesday on state TV. “They destroyed the Assembly,” the opposition “used it to call for a military invasion and steal our assets abroad.”

The move follows Maduro’s total restructuring of the country’s Electoral Council last week, in which he bypassed the National Assembly to unilaterally appoint five new members loyal to him — successfully tightening his grip on the Electoral Council, known as CNE. Gutierrez is the brother of Jose Luis Gutierrez, one of the new CNE officials.

Venezuela’s opposition, lead by Juan Guaido, said they would not participate in a “false” elections and rejected the court’s ruling. Yet the vote is likely to spark fierce debate among the four main opposition parties, which are unlikely to take a unified position, Eurasia analysts wrote Monday.

—Bloomberg News

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